What is Massachusetts known for? What kind of state is Massachusetts? I Mystery I History II facts

Massachusetts state image

What is Massachusetts known for?

Massachusetts (officially called a commonwealth) is known for being the landing place of the Mayflower and the Pilgrims. English explorer and colonist John Smith named the state for the Massachuset tribe. Boston, the state capital, was a hotbed of activity, including the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, during the American Revolution. In addition to its revolutionary spirit, the state is known for sparking the American Industrial Revolution with the growth of textile mills in Lowell, and for its large Irish-American population.

Capital: Boston

Population: 6.98 Million(2021)

Size: 10,554 square miles

Nickname(s): Bay State

Motto: Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem (“By the sword we seek peace, but peace only underliberty”)

Tree: American Elm

Flower: Mayflower

Bird: Chickadee

official language: Englishlatin

Spoken language: English(77.7%), Spanish(8.6%), Portuguese(2.8%), Chinese(2.1%)

Dance: Square dance

Food: Cranberry, corn muffin, navy bean, Boston creampie, chocolate chip cookie, Boston cream doughnut

Sport: Basketball

20 popular Facts of Massachusetts State

  • Massachusetts was colonized in the 17th century. The beginning phase of this colonization was very difficult for the colonists and they suffered many hardships such as disease epidemics, starvation, war, political struggles and a massive witch hunt brought on by mass hysteria.
  • Although the New England colonies began as separate, privately-run colonies, by the end of the century the British government took them over and turned them into one large royal colony heavily regulated and ruled by the crown.
  • This section includes articles on the early explorers to Massachusetts, the Great Puritan Migration, the Mayflower, Plymouth Colony, the First Thanksgiving, Massachusetts Bay Colony, the New England Confederation, the Dominion of New England, King Philip’s War and the Salem Witch Trials
  • On March 10, 1876, it was here in Boston that the first telephone call was made when Alexander Graham Bell summoned his lab assistant, Thomas A. Watson. On the phone, he said, “Mr. Watson—come here—I want to see you.” Watson was in the next room where he heard the message from the receiver. In a letter to his father, he wrote: “The day is coming when telegraph wires will be laid on to houses just like water or gas — and friends will converse with each other without leaving home.”
  • Massachusetts has one of the lowest divorce rates among the US states. Nevada has the highest divorce rate of any state
  • The chocolate chip cookie was invented by Ruth Graves Wakefield and her husband in 1930 in the Toll House Restaurant in Whitman, Massachusetts
  • The chocolate chip cookie was invented by Ruth Graves Wakefield and her husband in 1930 in the Toll House Restaurant in Whitman, Massachusetts
  • Furthermore, the game of volleyball finds its roots in Massachusetts as well. The game of volleyball, originally called “mintonette,” was invented in 1895 by William G. Morgan
  • The state was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States of America
  • It is illegal in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to scare a pigeon.
  • Did you know that celebrating Christmas was banned in Massachusetts? In 1659 the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony made it a criminal offense to publicly celebrate the holiday. In 1856, however, Christmas finally became a public holiday in the state
  • As of 1st January 2019, the minimum wage per hour in Massachusetts is $12
  • The Ted Williams Tunnel interface in East Boston between the land-based approach and the underwater section is 90 feet below the surface of Boston Harbor, the deepest such connection in North America. Engineers were forced to make this tunnel so deep because of the depth of the Boston Harbor. They used the cut-and-cover method to construct it. The tunnel is a 1.6-mile long and dips to close to 100 feet below sea level. First opening for public use in 2003, it was one of the first major links constructed as part of the Big Dig. A toll is charged when entering the tunnel from either side
  • Boston, Massachusetts is the headquarter of the world’s leading brand of safety razors “Gillette.
  • The inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee, is currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
  • The Charles Williams, Jr. House located on Arlington Street, Somerville, is the location of the first residential telephone line in the world. The phone inside the house connected to the owner’s office 3 miles away at 109 Court Street in Boston. These two properties had the first telephone numbers – 1 & 2 of the Bell Telephone Company.
  • Massachusetts revolutionized the frozen fruit industry. Clarence Birdseye, developed the first freezer to quick-freeze fish and other foods including meat, vegetables etc. Foods that were frozen quickly as opposed to slow freezing tasted better. Birdseye was issued US Patent #1,773, 079 that marked the beginning of the frozen food industry. A range of frozen foods were test marketed in Springfield, Massachusetts; and after a great response from the public, the company continued to sell their frozen food products and the rest is history
  • Massachusetts is one of the nation’s leading producer of cranberries
  • To protest the British tea tax, many Bostonians dumped tea from three British ships into the sea. The event happened on Boston harbor and was since then widely known as the Boston Tea Party.
  • Massachusetts is the birth of American Revolution where the first resistance against the British colonial rule emerged.

the source of content credit to the factfile and History the link given to know more-https://thefactfile.org/massachusetts-facts/ & https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/massachusetts

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